Kids Tennis Development System

Tennis can be fast and fun to learn for your child

Like most sports, there is a learning curve in tennis. You can’t really enjoy the game until you can actually sustain a decent back-and-forth rally. Especially with younger children whose attention span and physical abilities are still developing--it is not a game that one can just pick up and start playing.

Many, including adults, have tried picking up a racquet and played few times only to lose interest without continuing to the club level.

There has to be a balance of commitment, engagement and progressive learning. Ideally tennis strokes need to be developed in sequence, so learning through friends, YouTube or even traditional tennis coaching might not be an efficient method.

To learn the game correctly in the shortest possible time, Tennis Canada started endorsing the Progressive Tennis method of teaching to associated club’s province-wide that teach tennis. The Tennis School is one of those clubs.

At the Tennis School, we offer programs that utilize this type of training. Peewee Tennis and the Progressive Tennis series for juniors and the Tennis Express series for adults.

Summer Progressive

Progressive Tennis introduces the sport of tennis in a fun and interactive way that ensures immediate success for young players aged 5-10. Using appropriately sized racquets, mini nets, smaller court space and various grades of “soft” balls, fundamental skills are developed much quicker making the learning aspect more engaging early on.

ITF approved tennis balls graphic

It is proven to be effective and is used to enhance and accelerate the learning of tennis. It is also used by over 45 countries (including the US, Spain, France, Belgium and Switzerland) around the world with great success.

Lately, Canada seems to be experiencing a breakthrough in the tennis world. Previous to 2014, the last time Canadians had players on the top ten in the world tour was in 1994 (Greg Rusedski, ATP) for men’s and in 1985 (Carling Basset-Seguso, WTA) for women’s. Today not only do we have guys like Milos Raonic, Daniel Nestor, Vasek Posposil and Eugene Bouchard successfully leading the sport for Canada; we also seem to have more than a handful of young guns coming in as well—Denis Shapovalov, Felix Auger-Aliassime and Bianca Andreescu to name a few.

At the non-professional level, Tennis Canada reports a remarkable 32% growth in tennis participation counting more than 6.5 million Canadians playing tennis compared to pre-2014.

It is easy to conceive that giving a larger volume of players the opportunity to develop and experience positive tennis skills in a smaller amount of time produces successful results nationwide.

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